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Page 135 from Ethel Moir Diary, Vol 1

Moir, Ethel, 1916, Document
Page 135 from Ethel Moir Diary, Vol 1
Page 135 from Ethel Moir Diary, Vol 1
Page 135 from Ethel Moir Diary, Vol 1
Page 135 from Ethel Moir Diary, Vol 1
Library Item
25163
Page 135 from Ethel Moir Diary, Vol 1
Newspaper cutting:

THE EXPERIENCES OF THE HON. MRS HAVERFIELD ON THE ROUMANIAN FRONT WITH THE LONDON UNITS OF THE SCOTTISH WOMAN'S HOSPITAL.

IT was, indeed, a moving and most heroic story that Mrs Haverfield unfolded on Monday afternoon in Lady Muir Mackenzie's drawing room, 22, Draycott-place. Her hearers felt all the more in touch with the speaker when she told them that that very night Miss Onslow, who stood beside her, was leaving for the Russian front to join Dr Inglis, who it was hoped would hear the glad tidings that a good sum had been collected at the meeting. The hospital badly needs funds to comply with the wishes of the Serbian Government to provide two new field hospitals and motor transport sections to accompany the Serbian Division in Russia. Mr Stephen Graham was in the chair and introduced the speaker, who in her khaki looked astonishingly womanly to have combatted such extraordinary perils, never daunted, never stopped by any difficulties. From the moment she arrived at Archangel with her ambulance cars, kitchen cars, touring cars, and lorries without either a repairing mechanic or a mending car, she proved herself more than equal to the occasion, passing down impassable roads and no roads, having now and then to wait all night, not knowing but the enemy was upon them. Often wanting food, but meeting with the kindest hospitality and assistance from the Russian officers, she showed what women can do, for she induced a battery of artillery to let her have their horses. She could not speak too highly of the Serbians, so undaunted, so brave, and the description of their retreat before the enemy, with their families and household goods, was pitiable, old people being sometimes left by
1916
20.4 x 16.0 cm
Edinburgh and Scottish Collection