We use cookies to improve your experience, some are essential for the operation of this site. About cookies we use. Continue
Home
Favourites
0
Advanced search
Shopping cart
0
RegisterLog in

Salted paper print

Salted paper print
Salted paper print
Salted paper print
About the Image Medium
Salted paper print
Notes
Salted paper prints are the earliest photographic prints on paper. A sheet of paper is soaked first in a weak solution of Sodium Chloride (common salt), and then, after it has dried, in a strong solution of Silver Nitrate. This makes the paper sensitive to light and it will darken where it is exposed. The process of sensitizing paper in this way was invented by William Henry Fox Talbot in the mid 1830's, forming the basis of his 'photogenic drawing' process. Widespread use of this paper for printing began with Talbot's invention of the calotype, announced in 1841. Prints were made by exposing the sensitized paper to direct sunlight under a calotype negative and a sheet of glass for up to two hours. This produced what we refer to today as a salted paper print. This method of printing remained popular until the mid 1850's when they were overtaken in popularity by albumen prints.
Related Items