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Page 141 from Ethel Moir Diary, Vol 1

Moir, Ethel, 1916, Document
of 28
Page 141 from Ethel Moir Diary, Vol 1
Page 141 from Ethel Moir Diary, Vol 1
Page 141 from Ethel Moir Diary, Vol 1
Page 141 from Ethel Moir Diary, Vol 1
Library Item
25169
Page 141 from Ethel Moir Diary, Vol 1
Picture of St George's Cross medal and newspaper cutting from the Scotsman December 1916:

"The arrival of Dr Elsie Inglis in October 1916 on the Dobrudja front was the signal for a great outburst of enthusiasm amongst our men, who remembered her grand work in Serbia during the typhus epidemic of the preceding year. Her hospital of 300 beds she brought up immediately behind our firing line. Her organising talent and expert knowledge very soon attracted attention not only in the Dobrudja front, but in South Russia generally, so that the Commander-in-Chief of the Southern Russian Armies, General Zaichovsky, gave orders that 'All gravely wounded soldiers must be brought to the hospital of Dr E. Inglis, where they will get the very highest skill from her doctors and nurses.' "Dr Inglis maintained a unique discipline," adds the Serbian Chief of Medical Staff, " not only during the regular fighting, but also during the terrible retreat, when her hospitals were ceaselessly bombed by the enemy aeroplanes. From the time
of her arrival till her departure for England the other day, she worked without one single day's rest, shrinking not even from the most arduous and loathsome tasks. We shall never forget those days when we saw the Scottish women collecting our wounded from the firing line in their own automobiles at Babadag and Galatz. And she did not only devote herself to the wounded soldiers, but also to the alleviation of the sufferings of the destitute Rumanian and Russian refugees.
1916
20.4 x 16.0 cm
Edinburgh and Scottish Collection