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Chromolithograph

Chromolithograph
Chromolithograph
Chromolithograph
About the Image Medium
Chromolithograph
Notes
The chromolithograph is related to the lithograph process of producing prints. A lithograph employs the natural antipathy of grease and water to produce designs in large numbers and of similar quality.

Lithographs are produced by having a design drawn with greasy crayon or ink on the smooth surface of a slab of special limestone, called the lithographic stone, which is then prepared by the printer with chemical material that will fix the design to the stone. Water is applied, repelled by the greasy lines, but absorbed by the untouched areas of the stone. A roller is used to apply ink to the surface, which adheres to the drawn lines, but is repelled by the rest of the damp surface. A sheet of paper is placed on the stone, which is then passed through the lithographic press, transferring the design, in reverse, to the sheet of paper.

Chromolithographs employ the same process however different stones (sometimes as many as twenty) are used to print each of the different colours in the print.
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